Sunday, November 14, 2010

New Gets

Being new to the lathe, I've asked a few turners their opinion on chucks. Their one word answer was "Stronghold". The chuck comes with a chuck key, a allen wrench, woodworm screw, an adapter, and an information booklet.

The adapter is threaded to match your lathe.

There are four holes in the adapter, two are counter bored for attachment to the chuck. The other two are threaded to act as jack screws, used to pop the adapter off the chuck if removal is difficult.

Changing the chuck to a new lathe is as simple as attaching a different adapter.

The chuck can be threaded on the inboard or outboard spindle. If your lathe allows, a set screw can lock the chuck in place for turning in reverse.

The chuck comes with a set of Standard #2 jaws.

One of the jaws has a roll pin, it gets placed into one of the two positions with grooves. The long groove restricts the jaws from over extension, the short groove keeps the jaws travel inside the body. This avoids knuckle rapping protrusions.

The woodworm screw is firmly secured in the chuck. This photo shows the chuck missing a jaw to illustrate how the bit is locked in place.

With all parts properly secured and tightened, the screw and jaws make a secure anchor and base for large turnings. This is a quick method of attaching stock to the chuck, drill a pilot hole in the top of the bowl, then turn the outside and bottom. Make a spigot or a recess in the bottom of the bowl, then chuck it up in the jaws and hollow out the inside, removing the hole made by the screw.

I like this chuck very much. It is very quick and secure, and the repeatable centering is very convenient. The jaws included are very useful for small bowls, internal chucking with the jaws expanding inside a recess results in a nearly blemish free, tight hold. However, they have a 2" diameter minimum compression which makes them too big for standard 8/4 stock. Accessory jaws are available to expand the chucks capabilties from 3/8" to 14".

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I'm a woodworker on the Canadian prairie.